Better Site Speed: 4 Outside-the-Box Ideas



Tom-Anthony

Most of us have done site speed audits, or seen audits done by others. These can be really helpful for businesses, but I often find they’re quite narrow in focus. Typically we use well-known tools that throw up a bunch of things to look at, and then we dive into things from there.

However, if we dig deeper, there are often other ideas on how site speed can be improved. I often see plenty of opportunities that are never covered in site speed audits. Most site speed improvements are the result of a bunch of small changes, and so in this post I’m going to cover a few ideas that I’ve never seen in any site speed audit, all of which can make a difference.

A different angle on image optimization

Consider optimized SVGs over PNGs

I was recently looking to book some tickets to see Frozen 2 (because of, erm, my kids…) and so landed on this page. It makes use of three SVG images for transport icons:

SVG images are vector images, so they’re well-suited for things like icons; if you have images displayed as PNGs you may want to ask your designers for the original SVGs, as there can be considerable savings. Though not always better, using an SVG can save 60% of the filesize.

In this case, these icons come in at about 1.2k each, so they are quite small. They would probably fly under the radar of site speed audits (and neither Page Speed Insights or GTMetrix mention these images at all for this page).

So you may be thinking, “They’re less than 5k combined — you should look for bigger issues!”, but let’s take a look. Firstly, we can run them all through Jake Archibald’s SVG compression tool; this is a great free tool and on larger SVGs it can make a big difference.

In this case the files are small, so you may still be thinking “Why bother?” The tool compresses them without any loss in quality from ~1240 bytes to ~630 bytes — a good ratio but not much of an overall saving.

However… now that we’ve compressed them, we can think differently about delivering them…

Inline images

GTMetrix makes recommendations around inlining small bits of CSS or JS, but doesn’t mention inlining images. Images can also be inlined, and sometimes this can be the right approach.

If you consider that even a very small image file requires a complete round trip (which can have a very real impact on speed), even for small files this can take a long time. In the case of the Cineworld transport images above, I simulated a “Fast 3G” connection and saw:

The site is not using HTTP2 so there is a long wait period, and then the image (which is 1.2kb) takes almost 600ms to load (no HTTP2 also means this is blocking other requests). There are three of these images, so between them they can be having a real impact on page speed.

However, we’ve now compressed them to only a few hundred bytes each, and SVG images are actually made up of markup in a similar fashion to HTML:

You can actually put SVG markup directly into an HTML document!

If we do this with all three of the transport images, the compressed HTML for this page that is sent from the server to our browser increases from 31,182 bytes to 31,532 bytes — an increase of only 350 bytes for all 3 images!

So to recap:

  • Our HTML request has increased 350 bytes, which is barely anything
  • We can discard three round trips to the server, which we can see were taking considerable time

Some of you may have realized that if the images were not inline they could be cached separately, so future page requests wouldn’t need to refetch them. But if we consider:

  • Each image was originally about 1.5kb over the network (they aren’t gzipping the SVGs), with about 350 bytes of HTTP headers on top for a total of about 5.5kb transferred. So, overall we’ve reduced the amount of content over the network.
  • This also means that it would take over 20 pageviews to benefit from having them cached.

Takeaway: Consider where there are opportunities to use SVGs instead of PNGs.

Takeaway: Make sure you optimize the SVG images, use the free tool I linked to.

Takeaway: Inlining small images can make sense and bring outsized performance gains.

Note: You can also inline PNGs — see this guide.

Note: For optimized PNG/JPG images, try Kraken.

Back off, JavaScript! HTML can handle this…

So often nowadays, thanks to the prevalence of JavaScript libraries that offer an off-the-shelf solution, I find JavaScript being used for functionality that could be achieved without it. More JS libraries means more to download, maybe more round trips for additional files from the server, and then the JavaScript execution time and costs themselves.

I have a lot of sympathy for how you get to this point. Developers are often given poor briefs/specs that fail to specify anything about performance, only function. They are often time-poor and so it’s easy to end up just dropping something in.

However, a lot of progress has been made in terms of the functionality that can be achieved with HTML and or CSS. Let’s look at some examples.

Combo box with search

Dropdown boxes that have a text search option are a fairly common interface element nowadays. One recent article I came across described how to use the Select2 Javascript library to make such a list:

It is a useful UI element, and can help your users. However, in the Select2 library is a JavaScript library, which in turn relies on some CSS and the JQuery library. This means three round trips to collect a bunch of files of varying sizes:

  • JQuery – 101kb
  • Select2 JavaScript – 24kb
  • Select2 CSS – 3kb

This is not ideal for site speed, but we could certainly make the case it is worth it in order to have a streamlined interface for users.

However, it is actually possible to have this functionality out of the box with the HTML datalist element:

This allows the user to search through the list or to free type their own response, so provides the same functionality. Furthermore, it has a native interface on smartphones!

You can see this in action in this codepen.

Details/Summary

LonelyPlanet has a beautiful website, and I was looking at this page about Spain, which has a ‘Read More’ link that most web users will be familiar with:

Like almost every implementation of this that I see, they have used a JavaScript library to implement this, and once again this comes with a bunch of overheads.

However, HTML has a pair of built-in tags called details and summary, which are designed to implement this functionality exactly. For free and natively in HTML. No overheads, and more accessible for users needing a screen reader, while also conveying semantic meaning to Google.

These tags can be styled in various flexible ways with CSS and recreate most of the JS versions I have seen out there.

Check out a simple demo here: https://codepen.io/TomAnthony/pen/GRRLrmm

…and more

For more examples of functionality that you can achieve with HTML instead of JS, check out these links:

  • http://youmightnotneedjs.com/
  • https://dev.to/ananyaneogi/html-can-do-that-c0n

Takeaway: Examine the functionality of your sites and see where there may be opportunities to reduce your reliance on large Javascript libraries where there are native HTML/CSS options.

Takeaway: Remember that it isn’t only the size of the JS files that is problematic, but the number of round trips that are required.

Note: There are cases where you should use the JS solution, but it is important to weigh up the pros and cons.

Networking tune-ups

Every time the browser has to collect resources from a server, it has to send a message across the internet and back; the speed of this is limited by the speed of light. This may sound like a ridiculous thing to concern ourselves with, but it means that even small requests add time to the page load. If you didn’t catch the link above, my post explaining HTTP2 discusses this issue in more detail.

There are some things we can do to help either reduce the distance of these requests or to reduce the number of round trips needed. These are a little bit more technical, but can achieve some real wins.

TLS 1.3

TLS (or SSL) is the encryption technology used to secure HTTPS connections. Historically it has taken two round trips between the browser and the server to setup that encryption — if the user is 50ms away from the server, then this means 200ms per connection. Keep in mind that Google historically recommends aiming for 200ms to deliver the HTML (this seems slightly relaxed in more recent updates); you’re losing a lot of that time here.

The recently defined TLS 1.3 standard reduces this from two round trips to just one, which can shave some precious time off the users initial connection to your website.

Speak to your tech team about migrating to TLS 1.3; browsers that don’t support it will fallback to TLS 1.2 without issue. All of this is behind the scenes and is not a migration of any sort. There is no reason not to do this.

If you are using a CDN, then it can be as simple as just turning it on.

You can use this tool to check which versions of TLS you have enabled.

QUIC / HTTP 3

Over the last 2-3 years we have seen a number of sites move from HTTP 1.1 to HTTP 2, which is a behind-the-scenes upgrade which can make a real improvement to speed (see my link above if you want to read more).

Right off the back of that, there is an emerging pair of standards known as QUIC + HTTP/3, which further optimize the connection between the browser and the server, further reducing the round trips required.

Support for these is only just beginning to become viable, but if you are a CloudFlare customer you can enable that today and over the coming 6 months as Chrome and Firefox roll support out, your users will get a speed boost.

Read more here: https://blog.cloudflare.com/http3-the-past-present-and-future/

Super routing

When users connect to your website, they have to open network connections from wherever they are to your servers (or your CDN). If you imagine the internet as a series of roads, then you could imagine they need to ‘drive’ to your server across these roads. However, that means congestion and traffic jams.

As it turns out, some of the large cloud companies have their own private roads which have fewer potholes, less traffic, and improved speed limits. If only your website visitors could get access to these roads, they could ‘drive’ to you faster!

Well, guess what? They can!

For CloudFlare, they provide this access via their Argo product, whereas if you are on AWS at all then you can use their Global Accelerator. This allows requests to your website to make use of their private networks and get a potential speed boost. Both are very cheap if you are already customers.

Takeaway: A lot of these sorts of benefits are considerably easier to get if you’re using a CDN. If you’re not already using a CDN, then you probably should be. CloudFlare is a great choice, as is CloudFront if you are using AWS. Fastly is the most configurable of them if you’re more of a pro.

Takeaway: TLS 1.3 is now very widely supported and offers a significant speed improvement for new connections.

Takeaway: QUIC / HTTP3 are only just starting to get support, but over the coming months this will roll out more widely. QUIC includes the benefits of TLS 1.3 as well as more. A typical HTTP2 connection nowadays needs 3 round trips to open; QUIC needs just one!

Takeaway: If you’re on CloudFlare or AWS, then there is potential to get speed ups just from flipping a switch to turn on smart routing features.

Let CSS do more

Above I talked about how HTML has built-in functionality that you can leverage to save relying on solutions that are ‘home-rolled’ and thus require more code (and processing on the browsers side) to implement. Here I’ll talk about some examples where CSS can do the same for you.

Reuse images

Often you find pages that are using similar images throughout the page in several places. For example, variations on a logo in different colors, or arrows that point in both directions. As unique assets (however similar they may be), each of these needs to be downloaded separately.

Returning to my hunt for cinema tickets above, where I was looking at this page, we can see a carousel that has left and right arrows:

Similarly to the logic used above, while these image files are small, they still require a round trip to fetch from the server.

However, the arrows are identical — just pointing in opposite directions! It’s easy for us to use CSS’s transform functionality to use one image for both directions:

You can check out this codepen for an example.

Another example is when the same logo appears in different styles on different parts of the page; often they will load multiple variations, which is not necessary. CSS can re-color logos for you in a variety of ways:

There is a codepen here showing this technique in action. If you want to calculate the CSS filter value required to reach an arbitrary color, then check out this amazing color calculator.

Interactions (e.g. menus & tabs)

Often navigation elements such as menus and tabs are implemented in JavaScript, but these too can be done in pure CSS. Check out this codepen for an example:

Animations

CSS3 introduced a lot of powerful animation capability into CSS. Often these are not only faster than JavaScript versions, but can also be smoother too as they can run in the native code of the operating system rather than having to execute relatively slower Javascript.

Check out Dozing Bird as one example:

You can find plenty more in this article. CSS animations can add a lot of character to pages at a relatively small performance cost.

…and more

For more examples of functionality that you can achieve using pure CSS solutions, take a look at:

  • http://youmightnotneedjs.com/
  • https://dev.to/ananyaneogi/css-can-do-that-18g7m

Takeaway: Use CSS to optimize how many files you have to load using rotations or filters.

Takeaway: CSS animations can add character to pages, and often require less resources than JavaScript.

Takeaway: CSS is perfectly capable of implementing many interactive UI elements.

Wrap up

Hopefully you’ve found these examples useful in themselves, but the broader point I want to make is that we should all try to think a bit more out of the box with regards to site speed. Of particular importance is reducing the number of round trips needed to the server; even small assets take some time to fetch and can have an appreciable impact on performance (especially mobile).

There are plenty more ideas than we’ve covered here, so please do jump into the comments if you have other things you have come across.



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7 easy ways to multiply your conversions



Digital Marketing Depot

Ask marketers what their goals are, and one of the first things they will say is to deliver a more personalized experience to their customers. This isn’t a goal aimed solely at increasing conversions; it’s also about meeting customers’ growing expectations.

To put this into context, five years ago, people were awed when Amazon could recommend a product they’d love. Today, users expect that Netflix will recommend to them another binge-worthy series based on their tastes.

So how does a marketer meet this high demand for personalized communications? The answer is in understanding the power of dynamic content and how it makes static content marketing obsolete.

In this free guide, Sharpspring outlines seven simple ways marketers can use dynamic content to connect with audiences in a more organic and personalized way.

Grab your copy to find out:

  • How top brands like Netflix and Amazon use dynamic content.
  • The marketing automation features that enable you to deliver personalized experiences.
  • Ways to personalize your emails, landing pages, forms, pop-ups and more using dynamic content.

Visit Digital Marketing Depot to download “7 Easy Ways to Multiply Your Conversions.”

About The Author

Digital Marketing Depot is a resource center for digital marketing strategies and tactics. We feature hosted white papers and E-Books, original research, and webcasts on digital marketing topics — from advertising to analytics, SEO and PPC campaign management tools to social media management software, e-commerce to e-mail marketing, and much more about internet marketing. Digital Marketing Depot is a division of Third Door Media, publisher of Search Engine Land and Marketing Land, and producer of the conference series Search Marketing Expo and MarTech. Visit us at http://digitalmarketingdepot.com.





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They’re the Best Around: The Top 25 Moz Blog Posts of 2019



FeliciaCrawford

Well, folks, it’s that time of year again. It’s hard to believe we’ve already gone another turn around the ol’ sun. But I’ve consulted my analytics data and made my SQL queries, and I’m here today to present to you the list of the top Moz Blog posts of 2019!

For a little perspective, we published 207 blog posts, averaging out to about 4 per week. Out of those 207, the twenty-five I’m sharing with you below were the most-read pieces of the year. If you’re strapped for time (and who isn’t in our industry?), survey says these are the articles that aren’t to be missed. And bonus — a good chunk of them are videos, so bring out the chocolate popcorn and settle down to watch!

(If chocolate popcorn sounds new and unfamiliar to you, I implore you to check out the Cinerama in Seattle’s Belltown neighborhood the next time you’re in town for MozCon. It is life-changing. Get the mix of regular and chocolate and never, ever look back.)

I’ll be sharing the top keywords each post ranks for according to Keyword Explorer, too, to give you some idea of why these posts have continued to be favorites throughout the year. Gotta love that “Explore by Site” feature — it makes my job way too easy sometimes! 😉

(For the Keyword Explorer nerds in the audience, I’ll be filtering the rankings to positions 1–3 and organizing them by highest monthly search volume. I want to see what we’re ranking highly for that gets lots of eyeballs!)

Ready to get started? I sure am. Let’s dive in.


The top 25 Moz Blog posts of 2019

1. On-Page SEO for 2019 – Whiteboard Friday

Britney Muller, January 4th

57,404 reads

Top keywords according to Keyword Explorer: seo 2019 (#3, 501–850), seo best practices 2019 (#3, 501–850), homepage seo 2019 (#1, 0–10)

On-page SEO has long been a favorite topic for y’all, and the top number-one winner, winner, chicken dinner post of 2019 reflects that loud and proud. In this expert checklist, Britney Muller shares her best tips for doing effective on-page SEO for 2019.

And if you want a hint on one reason this puppy has been so popular, check out #10 in this very list. 😉

2. The 60 Best Free SEO Tools [100% Free]

Cyrus Shepard, June 10th

51,170 reads

Top keywords according to Keyword Explorer: seo tools (#1, 6.5k–9.3k), free seo tools (#1, 1.7k–2.9k), free seo (#1, 501–850)

This post is a testament to the power of updating and republishing your best content. Cyrus originally authored this post years ago and gave it a sorely needed update in 2019. There are literally hundreds of free SEO tools out there, so this article focused on only the best and most useful to add to your toolbox.

3. The Ultimate Guide to SEO Meta Tags

Kate Morris, July 24th

42,276 reads

Top keywords according to Keyword Explorer: seo meta tags (#1, 501–850), 1-page meta (#2, 501–850), what are meta tags (#3, 501–850)

Here’s another vote for the power of republishing really good content that you know your audience craves. Originally published in November 2010, this is the second time we’ve asked Kate to update this article and it continues to deliver value ten years later. SEO certainly changes, but some topics remain popular and necessary throughout all the ups and downs.

4. The One-Hour Guide to SEO

Rand Fishkin, throughout 2019

41,185 reads for the first post (143,165 for all six combined)

Top keywords according to Keyword Explorer: moz seo guide (#2, 201–500), moz beginners guide to seo (#3, 101–200), moz guide to seo (#2, 11–50)

A “best of the Moz Blog” list wouldn’t be complete without Rand! His six-part video series detailing all the most important things to know about SEO was originally published on the Moz Blog as six separate Whiteboard Fridays. We’ve since redirected those posts to a landing page in our Learning Center, but the first episode on SEO strategy earned over 41k unique pageviews in its time live on the blog.

5. A New Domain Authority Is Coming Soon: What’s Changing, When, & Why

Russ Jones, February 5th

38,947 reads

Top keywords according to Keyword Explorer: moving a 60 da to a 90 da seo (#1, 0–10), moz da update 2019 (#1, 0–10), upcoming domain change (#1, 0–10)

When we upgraded our Domain Authority algorithm in March, we knew it would be a big deal for a lot of people — so we put extra effort into education ahead of the launch. Russ’s initial announcement post introducing the coming changes was the foremost source for information, earning ample attention as a result.

6. How Google Evaluates Links for SEO [20 Graphics]

Cyrus Shepard, July 1st

38,715 reads

Top keywords according to Keyword Explorer: free google picture of created equal (#2, 0–10), google 1 page 2 links (#2, 0–10), google top rankingillustrations (#2, 0–10)

All right, I admit it: we did a ton of content updating and republishing this year. And it seriously paid off. Cyrus revamped a perennially popular post by Rand from 2010, bumping it from ten graphics to twenty and giving it a much-needed refresh almost a decade after the original post. The top keywords are kind of weird, right? Check out the title on the original post — looks like we’ve got a little work to do with this one to get it ranking for more relevant terms!

7. Do Businesses Really Use Google My Business Posts? A Case Study

Ben Fisher, February 12th

32,938 reads

Top keywords according to Keyword Explorer:  google my business posts (#2, 201–500), how to post on google my business (#3, 101–200), google business post (#3, 51–100)

Even a couple of years after Google My Business Posts became an option, it wasn’t clear how many businesses are actually using them. Ben Fisher asked the important questions and did the legwork to find the answers in this case study that examined over 2,000 GMB profiles.

8. Announcing the New Moz SEO Essentials Certificate: What It Is & How to Get Certified

Brian Childs, May 1st

32,434 reads

Top keywords according to Keyword Explorer: moz certification (#3, 101–500), moz seo certification (#2, 51–100), moz academy (#3, 51–100)

One of our most-asked questions from time immemorial was “Does Moz offer an SEO certification?” With the launch of our SEO Essentials certificate in May of this year, the answer finally became yes! 

9. Optimizing for Searcher Intent Explained in 7 Visuals

Rand Fishkin, March 23rd

29,636 reads

Top keywords according to Keyword Explorer: user intent moz (#2, 0–10)

What does it mean to target the “intent” of searchers rather than just the keyword(s) they’ve looked up? These seven short visuals explain the practice of intent-targeting and optimization.

10. 7 SEO Title Tag Hacks for Increased Rankings + Traffic – Best of Whiteboard Friday

Cyrus Shepard, June 7th

26,785 reads

Top keywords according to Keyword Explorer: title tags for landing page (#2, 11–50), moz free hack (#1, 0–10),  title tag hacks (#1, 0–10)

Title tags can have a huge impact on your click-through rates when optimized correctly. In this Whiteboard Friday, Cyrus shares how to use numbers, dates, questions, top referring keywords, and more to boost your CTR, traffic, and rankings.

11. E-A-T and SEO: How to Create Content That Google Wants

Ian Booth, June 4th

25,681 reads

Top keywords according to Keyword Explorer: eat seo (#2, 201–500), eat google (#2, 51–100), eat google seo (#1, 11–50)

Ian Booth covers the three pillars of E-A-T and shares tips on how to incorporate each into your content strategy so that you can rank for the best search terms in your industry.

12. 10 Basic SEO Tips to Index + Rank New Content Faster – Whiteboard Friday

Cyrus Shepard, May 17th

24,463 reads

Top keywords according to Keyword Explorer: how to index a link faster (#2, 11–50), blog seo index (#1, 0–10),  fast on-demand seo (#2, 0–10)

When you publish new content, you want users to find it ranking in search results as fast as possible. Fortunately, there are a number of tips and tricks in the SEO toolbox to help you accomplish this goal. Sit back, turn up your volume, and let the Cyrus Shepard show you exactly how in this episode of Whiteboard Friday.

13. Page Speed Optimization: Metrics, Tools, and How to Improve – Whiteboard Friday

Britney Muller, February 1st

24,265 reads

Top keywords according to Keyword Explorer: page speed optimization (#1, 51–100),  page speed metrics (#3, 11–50), optimize page speed (#1, 0–10)

What are the most crucial things to understand about your site’s page speed, and how can you begin to improve? In this edition of Whiteboard Friday, Britney Muller goes over what you need to know to get started.

14. How Google’s Nofollow, Sponsored, & UGC Links Impact SEO

Cyrus Shepard, September 10th

24,262 reads

Top keywords according to Keyword Explorer:  how to send my publishers no follow links (#1, 0–10), moz nofollow links (#2, 0–10), rel= sponsored (#2, 0–10)

Google shook up the SEO world by announcing big changes to how publishers should mark nofollow links. The changes — while beneficial to help Google understand the web — nonetheless caused confusion and raised a number of questions. We’ve got the answers to many of your questions here.

15. How to Identify and Tackle Keyword Cannibalization in 2019

Samuel Mangialavori, February 11th

21,871 reads

Top keywords according to Keyword Explorer: keyword cannibalization (#2, 201–500), ahrefs keyword cannibalization (#3, 11–50), what is keyword cannibalization (#3, 11–50)

Keyword cannibalization is an underrated but significant problem, especially for sites that have been running for several years and end up having lots of pages. In this article, learn how to find and fix keyword cannibalization before it impacts your SEO opportunities.

16. How Bad Was Google’s Deindexing Bug?

Dr. Pete, April 11th

17,831 reads

Top keywords according to Keyword Explorer: google de-indexing again (#2, 11–50), google index bug (#3, 11–50)

On Friday, April 5, Google confirmed a bug that was causing pages to be deindexed. Our analysis suggests that roughly 4% of stable URLs fell out of page-1 rankings on April 5, and that deindexing impacted a wide variety of websites.

17. What Is BERT? – Whiteboard Friday

Britney Muller, November 8th

16,797 reads

Top keywords according to Keyword Explorer: what is bert (#2, 11–50), moz wbf (#2, 0–10)

There’s a lot of hype and misinformation about the newest Google algorithm update. What actually is BERT, how does it work, and why does it matter to our work as SEOs? Join our own machine learning and natural language processing expert Britney Muller as she breaks down exactly what BERT is and what it means for the search industry.

18. How Do I Improve My Domain Authority (DA)?

Dr. Pete, April 17th

16,478 reads

Top keywords according to Keyword Explorer: how to build domain authority (#2, 501–850), how to increase domain authority (#2, 501–850), how to improve domain authority (#1, 11–50)

Written to help research and inform his MozCon 2019 talk, this article by Dr. Pete covers how and why to improve a Domain Authority score.

19. How to Get Into Google News – Whiteboard Friday

Barry Adams, January 11th

16,265 reads

Top keywords according to Keyword Explorer: how to get on google news (#3, 101–200), google news inclusion (#3, 51–100), getting into google news (#3, 11–50)

How do you increase your chances of getting your content into Google News? Barry Adams shares the absolute requirements and the nice-to-have extras that can increase your chances of appearing in the much-coveted news carousel.

20. Topical SEO: 7 Concepts of Link Relevance & Google Rankings

Cyrus Shepard, April 1st

15,579 reads

Top keywords according to Keyword Explorer: link relevance (#2, 0–10), read more on seo (#2, 0–10),relevant links (#2, 0–10)

To rank in Google, it’s not simply the number of votes you receive from popular pages, but the relevance and authority of those links as well.

21. The 5 SEO Recommendations That Matter in the End

Paola Didone, March 26th

13,879 reads

Top keywords according to Keyword Explorer: seo recommendations (#1, 11–50), 10 seo recommend (#1, 0–10), seo recommendations report (#1, 0–10)

What are the most steadfast, evergreen SEO recommendations you can make for your clients? These are the top five that this SEO has encountered that consistently deliver positive results.

22. An SEO’s Guide to Writing Structured Data (JSON-LD)

Brian Gorman, May 9th

13,862 reads

Top keywords according to Keyword Explorer: json structured data (#3, 0–10), seo json content (#3, 0–10), seomoz structured data (#3, 0–10)

This guide will help you understand JSON-LD and structured data markup. Go beyond the online generators and prepare your web pages for the future of search!

23. A Comprehensive Analysis of the New Domain Authority

Russ Jones, March 5th

13,333 reads

Top keywords according to Keyword Explorer: does post clustering build domain authority (#2, 11–50), who invented domain authority (#3, 11–50), domain authority curve (#1, 0–10)

A statistical look at Moz’s much-improved Domain Authority. Find out how it performs vs previous versions of Domain Authority, competitor metrics, and more.

24. The Practical Guide to Finding Anyone’s Email Address

David Farkas, November 26th

13,263 reads

Top keywords according to Keyword Explorer: N/A in positions #1–3

The never-ending struggle with link building begins with finding contact info. David Farkas outlines a few simple and easy ways to discover the right person to reach out to, plus some tips on which tools and strategies work best.

25. How to Use Domain Authority 2.0 for SEO – Whiteboard Friday

Cyrus Shepard, March 8th

12,940 reads

Top keywords according to Keyword Explorer: domain authority 2.0 (#2, 11–50), thought domain authority keywords (#1, 0–10), domain authority for seo (#2, 0–10)

Domain Authority is a well-known metric throughout the SEO industry, but what exactly is the right way to use it? In this Whiteboard Friday, Cyrus Shepard explains what’s new with the new Domain Authority 2.0 update and how to best harness its power for your own SEO success.


That’s a wrap for the top posts of 2019! Did we miss any that were on your own must-read list? Let us know in the comments below. We can’t wait to see what 2020 has in store!



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The Top 5 Most Common Marketing Problems



Your Imprint

Inexperience or Understaffing

Simply put, there are too many roles to fill and not enough talented people to fill them. You may have a web designer, but do you have an SEO specialist?  Or how about an ads and conversion manager?  Even if you have someone willing to learn, there’s only so much they can do with their time, and marketing is a complex and time-intensive industry.  

Difficulty With Report Interpretation

How do you know what to look at and for to determine if you’re getting anything in return for the marketing investment?  The data is so immense that I nearly just broke down a bit.  Have you ever seen these reports?  Google Analytics, SERP analysis, ranking reports, Content Reviews, SEO audits, conversion analysis, ROI tracking, etc. etc. etc., they’re enough to keep you busy and make you dizzy. 

Team Communication Breakdown  

No or bad communication keeps the team and executives in the dark. Without a good strategy or reporting structure, there’s no way to adjust the campaigns to meet the ever-growing and persistent demands of the modern-day consumer. 

Marketing teams need to understand the effect of what they do in order to stay motivated and creative.  Defining goals, constantly discussing what a win looks like, and reviewing the reports regularly will go a long way to helping the team stay focused and efficient. 

Disconnect between team and executives

You know that stomach-dropping feeling you get when you learn something shocking?  Like, “hey, someone just signed up for a credit card in your name with your social.”  You immediately want to panic and shut everything down, go into self-preservation mode, put up your defenses, and get ready to fight. 

That’s what happens when there’s no comprehensive reporting strategy in place and the marketing manager can’t show the business why it’s forking out money every month for your service. 

Without a clear indication of what worked, what didn’t, and what broke even, the marketing manager will find themselves up shit’s creek with their clients or bosses.

When executives or decision makers aren’t involved with the planning, delivery, or execution of the marketing strategy, there tends to be a complete breakdown in understanding and an abundance of doubt in whether the manager is worth their investment. 

Bottom line:  Show your work, prove your efforts, communicate clearly, and try to get executives engaged in the strategy.

Unable to close the loop with the sales team

So, you’re getting lots of leads through your website, and maybe you’ve seen an increase in digital sales; however, sales don’t seem to be growing, and you don’t seem to be getting any new customers.  If that sounds familiar, there’s a gap between sales and marketing. 

The 2 most common gaps in the marketing-sales loop are:

  1. The marketing team doesn’t hand off leads/conversions properly or effectively.
  2. The sales team doesn’t have a system in place to nurture or improve the leads or conversions.



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Discovery Conversion Case Study – Inbound Marketing Agency



Rachael Herman

Business Message/Focus

The restaurant is focused on local partnerships, sustainability, and healthy eating. 

The Promotion

The promotion was for a limited-time item that would be featuring a special vegetable from a local farmer.  Customers had to pre-order for pickup on scheduled days.

 

The Marketing Budget

We had a small marketing budget of $100 for this single promotion, and there would be no paid advertising.

The Results

Digitally, of the 5,000 people who were reached, 125 of them went to the landing page to see what this was all about. 

Of those, 25 quarts of soup were ordered by 14 people.  That’s a visitor-to-lead conversion (also referred to as a CTR or click-through rate) of 2.5% and a lead-to-customer conversion of 11.2%. Lead to sale is 20%. Those are good conversions for an organic promotion.

All other sales were made in-store or over the phone for total net sales of $702.  The client spent $450 making the item and, with marketing costs (we were under budget), ROI was calculated to be 1.7, or 170%.

Not a great return, but it is positive, so there’s room for PPC planning. 

What We Recommended

We recommended increasing exposure by adding pay-per-click on Google and Facebook.  If we increase exposure to 50,000 digital views by adding just $200 to that part of the budget, we could improve ROI to about 3-5, based on the above conversion rates. 

We’d focus on driving traffic to a specific landing page using UTM codes to watch and properly target the ad.  We also recommended doing long-term digital marketing through inbound methods to improve long-term growth, sales, and customer retention. 



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Facebook tells senators it still uses location for ads despite user location services opt-out



Greg Sterling

We might soon see another FTC investigation of Facebook for “consumer deception.” The company acknowledged in a letter to two U.S. senators that it continues to capture and use location to serve relevant ads even if users have turned off location services.

Bipartisan inquiry into Facebook’s user of location. Senators Coons and Hawley sent a letter in November to Facebook “raising concern that Facebook ignores the wishes of users who don’t want their exact location to be tracked,” The Hill first reported.

Facebook, in September, pledged to be respectful of user choices around location tracking. In a blog post, the company said, “You can control whether your device shares precise location information with Facebook via Location Services, a setting on your phone or tablet. We may still understand your location using things like check-ins, events and information about your internet connection.” So Facebook is explicitly saying it will still use location.

Facebook not technically ‘deceptive.’ This caveat and the word “precise” may wind up saving Facebook from legal consequences. Mirroring the language in its blog post, the company explained in response to Coons and Hawley that it continues to use location (though not precise location) from other sources such as user check-ins and IP address. So, as laid out in its post, the company isn’t technically “deceiving” people, though they may not have caught that point.

Google was similarly embroiled in controversy over location tracking after it was discovered that the company captured user location even if location history was turned off. Google subsequently made changes and offered more transparency and user control over user location.

Why we care. As an aside, research has shown that locally relevant ads outperform ads without location. People generally prefer “relevant” ads. The real issue here is trust; and on that question, Facebook is still in the dog house. The company continues to struggle following the post-2016 revelations surrounding Cambridge Analytica and the exploitation of user data by third parties on the platform.


About The Author

Greg Sterling is a Contributing Editor at Search Engine Land. He writes about the connections between digital and offline commerce. He previously held leadership roles at LSA, The Kelsey Group and TechTV. Follow him Twitter or find him on LinkedIn.





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Actually Accurate Analytics – Whiteboard Friday



RuthBurrReedy

Clean, useful Google Analytics data is all-important — both for you, and for the clients and colleagues that will be working on the site in the future. Ruth Burr Reedy shares her absolute best tips for getting your Analytics data accurate, consistent, and future-proof in this week’s Whiteboard Friday.

Click on the whiteboard image above to open a high resolution version in a new tab!

Video Transcription

Hi, Moz fans. I’m Ruth Burr Reedy, and I am the Vice President of Strategy at UpBuild. We’re a technical marketing agency specializing in technical SEO and advanced web analytics. One of the things I wanted to talk about today, Whiteboard Friday, is about analytics.

So when I talk to SEOs about analytics and ask them, “When it comes to analytics, what do you do? What do you do first? When you’re taking on a new client, what do you do?” SEOs are often really eager to tell me, “I dive into the data. Here’s what I look like.Here are the views that I set up. Here’s how I filter things. Here’s where I go to gain insights.”

But what I often don’t hear people talk about, that I think is a super important first step with a new client or a new Analytics account, or really any time if you haven’t done it, is making sure your Analytics data is accurate and consistent. Taking the time to do some basic Analytics housekeeping is going to serve you so far into the future and even beyond your time at that given client or company.

The people who come after you will be so, so, so thankful that you did these things. So today we’re going to talk about actually accurate analytics. 

Is your Analytics code on every page?

So the first question that you should ask yourself is: Is your Analytics code on every page? Is it?

Are you sure? There are a lot of different things that can contribute to your Analytics code not actually being on every single page of your website. One of them is if portions of your site have a different CMS from the main CMS that’s driving your site. 

Forums, subdomains, landing pages

We see this a lot with things like subdomains, with things like forums. A really common culprit is if you’re using a tool like Marketo or HubSpot or Unbounce to build landing pages, it’s really easy to forget to put Analytics on those pages.

Over time those pages are out there in the world. Maybe it’s just one or two pages. You’re not seeing them in Analytics at all, which means you’re probably not thinking about them, especially if they’re old. But that doesn’t mean that they don’t still exist and that they aren’t still getting views and visits. 

Find orphan pages

So, okay, how do we know about these pages? Well, before you do anything, it’s important to remember that, because of the existence of orphan pages, you can’t only rely on a tool like Screaming Frog or DeepCrawl to do a crawl of your site and make sure that code is on every page, because if the crawler can’t reach the page and your code is not on the page, it’s kind of in an unseeable, shrouded in mystery area and we don’t want that.

Export all pages

The best way, the most sure way to make sure that you are finding every page is to go to your dev team, to go to your developers and ask them to give you an export of every single URL in your database. If you’re using WordPress, there’s actually a really simple tool you can use. It’s called Export All URLs in the grand tradition of very specifically named WordPress tools.

But depending on your CMS and how your site is set up, this is something that you can almost certainly do. I need a list of every single URL on the website, every single URL in our database. Your dev team can almost certainly do this. When you get this, what you can do, you could, if you wanted, simply load that list of URLs. You’d want to filter out things like images and make sure you’re just looking at the HTML documents.

Dedupe with Screaming Frog

Once you had that, you could load that whole thing into Screaming Frog as a list. That would take a while. What you could do instead, if you wanted, is run a Screaming Frog crawl and then dedupe that with Screaming Frog. So now you’ve got a list of your orphan pages, and then you’ve got a list of all of the pages that Screaming Frog can find. So now we have a list of every single page on the website.

We can use either a combination of crawler and list or just the list, depending on how you want to do it, to run the following custom search. 

What to do in Screaming Frog

Configuration > Custom > Search

So in Screaming Frog, what you can do is you can go to Configuration and then you go to Custom Search. It will pop up a custom search field. What this will allow you to do is while the crawler is crawling, it will search for a given piece of information on a page and then fill that in a custom field within the crawler so that you can then go back and look at all of the pages that have this piece of information.

What I like to do when I’m looking for Analytics information is set up two filters actually — one for all of the pages that contain my UA identifier and one for all of the pages that don’t contain it. Because if I just have a list of all the pages that contain it, I still don’t know which pages don’t contain it. So you can do this with your unique Google Analytics identifier.



If you’re deploying Google Analytics through Google Tag Manager, instead you would look for your GTM Number, your GTM ID. So it just depends how you’ve implemented Analytics. You’re going to be looking for one of those two numbers. Almost every website I’ve worked on has at least a few pages that don’t have Analytics on them.

What you’ll sometimes also find is that there are pages that have the code or that should have the code on them, but that still aren’t being picked up. So if you start seeing these errors as you’re crawling, you can use a tool like Tag Assistant to go in and see, “Okay, why isn’t this actually sending information back to Google Analytics?” So that’s the best way to make sure that you have code on every single page. 

Is your code in the <head> and as high as possible?

The other thing you want to take a look at is whether or not your Analytics code is in the head of every page and as close to the top of the head as possible. Now I know some of you are thinking like, “Yeah, that’s Analytics implementation 101.” But when you’re implementing Analytics, especially if you’re doing so via a plug-in or via GTM, and, of course, if you’re doing it via GTM, the implementation rules for that are a little bit different, but it’s really easy for over time, especially if your site is old, other things to get added to the head by other people who aren’t you and to push that code down.

Now that’s not necessarily the end of the world. If it’s going to be very difficult or time-consuming or expensive to fix, you may decide it’s not worth your time if everything seems like it’s firing correctly. But the farther down that code gets pushed, the higher the likelihood that something is going to go wrong, that something is going to fire before the tracker that the tracker is not going to pick up, that something is going to fire that’s going to prevent the tracker from firing.

It could be a lot of different things, and that’s why the best practice is to have it as high up in the head as possible. Again, whether or not you want to fix that is up to you. 

Update your settings:

Once you’ve gotten your code firing correctly on every single page of your website, I like to go into Google Analytics and change a few basic settings. 

1. Site Speed Sample Rate

The first one is the Site Speed Sample Rate.

So this is when you’re running site speed reports in Google Analytics. Typically they’re not giving you site timings or page timings for the site as a whole because that’s a lot of data. It’s more data than GA really wants to store, especially in the free version of the tool. So instead they use a sample, a sample set of pages to give you page timings. I think typically it’s around 1%.

That can be a very, very small sample if you don’t have a lot of traffic. It can become so small that the sample size is skewed and it’s not relevant. So I usually like to bump up that sample size to more like 10%. Don’t do 100%. That’s more data than you need. But bump it up to a number that’s high enough that you’re going to get relevant data.

2. Session and Campaign Timeout

The other thing that I like to take a look at when I first get my hands on a GA account is the Session and Campaign Timeout. So session timeout is basically how long somebody would have to stay on your website before their first session is over and now they’ve begun a new session if they come back and do something on your site where now they’re not being registered as part of their original visit.

Historically, GA automatically determined session timeout at 30 minutes. But this is a world where people have a million tabs open. I bet you right now are watching this video in one of a million tabs. The longer you have a tab open, the more likely it is that your session will time out. So I like to increase that timeout to at least 60 minutes.

The other thing that Google automatically does is set a campaign timeout. So if you’re using UTM parameters to do campaign tracking, Google will automatically set that campaign timeout at six months. So six months after somebody first clicks that UTM parameter, if they come back, they’re no longer considered part of that same campaign.

They’re now a new, fresh user. Your customer lifecycle might not be six months. If you’re like a B2B or a SaaS company, sometimes your customer lifecycle can be two years. Sometimes if you’re like an e-com company, six months is a really long time and you only need 30 days. Whatever your actual customer lifecycle is, you can set your campaign timeout to reflect that.

I know very few people who are actually going to make that window shorter. But you can certainly make that longer to reflect the actual lifecycle of your customers. 

3. Annotations

Then the third thing that I like to do when I go into a Google Analytics account is annotate what I can. I know a lot of SEOs, when you first get into a GA account, you’re like, “Well, no one has been annotating.Ho-hum. I guess going forward, as of today, we’re going to annotate changes going forward.”

That’s great. You should definitely be annotating changes. However, you can also take a look at overall traffic trends and do what you can to ask your coworkers or your client or whatever your relationship is to this account, “What happened here?” Do you remember what happened here? Can I get a timeline of major events in the company, major product releases, press releases, coverage in the press?

Things that might have driven traffic or seen a spike in traffic, product launches. You can annotate those things historically going back in time. Just because you weren’t there doesn’t mean it didn’t happen. All right. So our data is complete. It’s being collected the way that we want to, and we’re tracking what’s happening.

Account setup

Cool. Now let’s talk about account setup. I have found that many, many people do not take the time to be intentional and deliberate when it comes to how they set up their Google Analytics account. It’s something that just kind of happens organically over time. A lot of people are constrained by defaults. They don’t really get what they’re doing.

What we can do, even if this is not a brand-new GA account, is try to impose some structure, order, consistency, and especially some clarity, not only for ourselves as marketers, but for anybody else who might be using this GA account either now or in the future. So starting out with just your basic GA structure, you start with your account.

Your Account Name is usually just your company name. It doesn’t totally matter what your Account Name is. However, if you’re working with a vendor, I know they’d prefer that it be your company name as opposed to something random that only makes sense to you internally, because that’s going to make it easier for them. But if you don’t care about that, you could conceivably name your account whatever you want. Most of the time it is your company name.

Then you’ve got your property, and you might have various properties. A good rule of thumb is that you should have one property per website or per group of sites with the same experience. So if you have one experience that goes on and off of a subdomain, maybe you have mysite.com and then you also have store.mysite.com, but as far as the user experience is concerned it’s one website, that could be one property.

That’s kind of where you want to delineate properties is based on site experiences. Then drilling down to views, you can have as many views as you want. When it comes to naming views, the convention that I like to use is to have the site or section name that you’re tracking in that specific view and then information about how that view is set up and how it’s intending to be used.

Don’t assume that you’re going to remember what you were doing last year a year from now. Write it down. Make it clear. Make it easy for people who aren’t you to use. You can have as many views as you want. You can set up views for very small sections of your site, for very specific and weird filters if there are some customizations you want to do. You can set up as many views as you need to use.

Must-have views

1. Raw data – Unfiltered, Don’t Touch

But I think there are three views that you should make sure you have. The first is a Raw Data view. This is a view with no filters on it at all. If you don’t already have one of these, then all of your data in the past is suspect. Having a view that is completely raw and unfiltered means if you do something to mess up the filtering on all your other views, you at least have one source of total raw data.

I know this is not new information for SEOs when it comes to GA account setup, but so many people don’t do it. I know this because I go into your accounts and I see that you don’t have it. If you don’t have it, set it up right now. Pause this video. Go set it up right now and then come back and watch the rest, because it’s going to be good. In addition to naming it “Raw Data Unfiltered,” I like to also add something like “Don’t Touch” or “For Historical Purposes Only,” if you’re not into the whole brevity thing, something that makes it really clear that not only is this the raw data, but also no one should touch it.

This is not the data we’re using. This is not the data we’re make decisions by. This is just our backup. This is our backup data. Don’t touch it. 

2. Primary view – Filtered, Use This One

Then you’re going to want to have your Primary view. So however many views you as a marketer set up, there are going to be other people in your organization who just kind of want the data.

So pick a view that’s your primary filtered view. You’re going to have a lot of your basic filters on this, things like filtering out your internal IP range, filtering out known bots. You might set up some filtering to capture the full hostname if you’re tracking between subdomains, things like that. But it’s your primary view with basic filtering. You’re going to want to name that something like “Use This One.”

Sometimes if there’s like one person and they won’t stop touching your raw data, you can even say like, “Nicole Use This One.” Whatever you need to label it so that even if you got sick and were in the hospital and unreachable, you won the lottery, you’re on an island, no one can reach you, people can still say, “Which of these 17 views that are set up should I use? Oh, perhaps it’s the one called ‘Use This One.'” It’s a clue. 

3. Test view – Unfiltered

Then I like to always have at least one view that is a Test view. That’s usually unfiltered in its base state. But it’s where I might test out filters or custom dimensions or other things that I’m not ready to roll out to the primary view. You may have additional views on top of those, but those are the three that, in my opinion, you absolutely need to have.

4. All Website Data

What you should not have is a view called “All Website Data.” “All Website Data” is what Google will automatically call a view when you’re first setting up GA. A lot of times people don’t change that as they’re setting up their Analytics. The problem with that is that “All Website Data” means different things to different people. For some people, “All Website Data” means the raw data.

For some people, “All Website Data” means that this is the “Use This One” view. It’s unclear. If I get into a GA account and I see that there is a view named “All Website Data,” I know that this company has not thought about how they’re setting up views and how they’re communicating that internally. Likely there’s going to be some filtering on stuff that shouldn’t have been filtered, some historical mishmash.

It’s a sign that you haven’t taken the time to do it right. In my opinion, a good SEO should never have a view called “All Website Data.” All right. Great. So we’ve got our views set up. Everything is configured the way that we want it. How that’s configured may be up to you, but we’ve got these basic tenets in place.

Goals

Let’s talk about goals. Goals are really interesting. I don’t love this about Google Analytics, but goals are forever. Once you set a goal in GA, information that is tracked to that number or that goal number within that goal set will always be tracked back to that. What that means is that say you have a goal that’s “Blue Widget Sales” and you’re tracking blue widget sales.

Goals are forever

Over time you discontinue the blue widget and now you’re only tracking red widget sales. So you rename the “Blue Widget Sales” widget to now it’s called “Red Widget Sales.” The problem is renaming the goal doesn’t change the goal itself. All of that historical blue widget data will still be associated with that goal. Unless you’re annotating carefully, you may not have a good idea of when this goal switched from tracking one thing to be tracking another thing.

This is a huge problem when it comes to data governance and making decisions based on historical data. 

The other problem is you have a limited number of goals. So you need to be really thoughtful about how you set up your goals because they’re forever. 

Set goals based on what makes you money

A basic rule is that you should set goals based on what makes you money.

You might have a lot of micro conversions. You might have things like newsletter sign-ups or white paper downloads or things like that. If those things don’t make you money, you might want to track those as events instead. More on that in a minute. Whatever you’re tracking as a goal should be related to how you make money. Now if you’re a lead gen biz, things like white paper downloads may still be valuable enough that you want to track them as a goal.

It just depends on your business. Think about goals as money. What’s the site here to do? When you think about goals, again, remember that they’re forever and you don’t get that many of them. 

Group goals efficiently

So any time you can group goals efficiently, take some time to think about how you’re going to do that. If you have three different forms and they’re all going to be scheduling a demo in some way or another, but they’re different forms, is there a way that you can have one goal that’s “Schedule a Demo” and then differentiate between which form it was in another way?

Say you have an event category that’s “Schedule a Demo” and then you use the label to differentiate between the forms. It’s one goal that you can then drill down. A classic mistake that I see with people setting up goals is they have the same goal in different places on the website and they’re tracking that differently. When I say, “Hey, this is the same goal and you’re tracking it in three different places,” they often say, “Oh, well, that’s because we want to be able to drill down into that data.”

Great. You can do that in Google Analytics. You can do that via Google Analytics reporting. You can look at what URLs and what site sections people completed a given goal on. You don’t have to build that into the goal. So try to group as efficiently as possible and think long term. If it at any time you’re setting up a goal that you know is someday going to be part of a group of goals, try to set it up in such a way that you can add to that and then drill down into the individual reports rather than setting up new goals, because those 20 slots go quick.

Name goals clearly

The other thing you’re going to want to do with goals and with everything — this is clearly the thesis for my presentation — is name them clearly. Name them things where it would be impossible not to understand exactly what it is. Don’t name your goal “Download.” Don’t name your goal “Thank You Page.”

Name your goal something specific enough that people can look at it at a glance. Even people who don’t work there right now, people in the future, the future people can look at your goals and know exactly what they were. But again, name them not so specifically that you can’t then encompass that goal wherever it exists on the site. So “Download” might be too broad.

“Blue Widget White Paper Download” might be too specific. “White Paper Download” might be a good middle ground there. Whatever it is for you, think about how you’re going to name it in such a way that it’ll make sense to somebody else, even if you don’t work there anymore and they can’t ask you. Now from talking about goals it kind of segues naturally into talking about events, event tracking.

Events

Event tracking is one of the best things about Google Analytics now. It used to be that to track an event you had to add code directly to a page or directly to a link. That was hard to do at scale and difficult to get implemented alongside conflicting dev possibilities. But now, with Google Tag Manager, you can track as many events as you want whenever you want to do them.

You can set them up all by yourself, which means that now you, as the marketer, as the Analytics person, become the person who is in charge of Google Analytics events. You should take that seriously, because the other side of that coin is that it’s very possible to get event creep where now you’re tracking way too many events and you’re tracking them inefficiently and inconsistently in ways that make it difficult to extract insights from them on a macro level.

What do you want and why?

So with events, think about what you want and why. Any time somebody is like, “I want to track this,” ask them, “Okay, what are we going to do with that information?” If they’re like, “I don’t know. I just want to know it.” That might not be a good case to make to track an event. Understand what you’re going to do with the data. Resist the urge to track just for tracking’s sake.

Resist data for data’s sake. I know it’s hard, because data is cool, but try your best. 

Naming conventions

As you take over, now that you are the person in charge of events, which you are, you’re taking this on, this is yours now, develop naming conventions for your events and then become the absolute arbiter of those conventions. Do not let anybody name anything unless it adheres to your conventions.

Category

Now how you name things is up to you. Some suggestions, for category, I like that to be the site section that something is in or maybe the item type. So maybe it’s product pages. Maybe it’s forms. Maybe it’s videos. However you are going to group these events on a macro level, that should be your category.

Action

The action is the action. So that’s click, submit, play, whatever the action is doing. 

Label

Then the label is where I like to get unique and make sure that I’m drilling down to just this one thing. So maybe that’s where I’ll have the actual CTA of the button, or which form it was that people filled out, or what product it was that they purchased. Again, think about information that you can get from other reports.

So for example, you don’t need to capture the URL that the event was recorded on as part of the label, because you can actually go in and look at all of your events by URL and see where that happened without having to capture it in that way. The important thing is that you have rules, that those rules are something that you can communicate to other people, and that they would then be able to name their own categories, actions, and labels in ways that were consistent with yours.

Over time, as you do this and as you rename old events, you’re going to have a more and more usable body of data. You’re going to be increasingly comparing apples to apples. You’re not going to have some things where Click is the action and some things where Click is the label, or things that should be in one category that are in two or three categories. Over time you’re going to have a much more usable and controllable body of event data.

Be consistent

Then you need to be ruthless about consistency with usage of these naming conventions. There will be no just setting up an event real quick. Or, in fact, there will be just setting up an event real quick, but it will be using these rules that you have very thoroughly outlined and communicated to everybody, and that you are then checking up to make sure everything is still tracking the same way. A big thing to watch for when you’re being ruthless about consistency is capitalization.

Capitalization in category action and label and event tracking will come back as two different things. Capital “C” and lowercase “c” category are two different things. So make sure as you’re creating new events that you have some kind of standardization. Maybe it’s the first letter is always capitalized. Maybe it’s nothing is ever capitalized.

It doesn’t matter what it is as long as it’s all the same. 

Think about the future!

Then think about the future. Think about the day when you win the lottery and you move to a beautiful island in the middle of the sea and you turn off your phone and you never think about Google Analytics again and you’re lying in the sand and no one who works with you now can reach you. If you never came back to work again, could the people who work there continue the tracking work that you’ve worked so hard to set up?

If not, work harder to make sure that’s the case. Create documentation. Communicate your rules. Get everybody on the same page. Doing so will make this whole organization’s data collection better, more actionable, more usable for years to come. If you do come back to work tomorrow, if in fact you work here for the next 10 years, you’ve just set yourself up for success for the next decade.

Congratulations. So these are the things that I like to do when I first get into a GA account. Obviously, there are a lot of other things that you can do in GA. That’s why we all love GA so much. 

Homework

But to break it down and give you all some homework that you can do right now.

Check for orphan pages

Tonight, go in and check for orphan pages.

When it comes to Analytics, those might be different or they might be the same as orphan pages in the traditional sense. Make sure your code is on every page. 

Rename confusing goals and views (and remove unused ones)

Rename all your confusing stuff. Remove the views that you’re not using. Turn off the goals that you’re not using. Make sure everything is as up to date as possible. 

Guard your raw data

Don’t let anybody touch that raw data. Rename it “Do Not Touch” and then don’t touch it. 

Enforce your naming conventions

Create them. Enforce them. Protect them. They’re yours now.

You are the police of naming conventions. 

Annotate everything

Annotate as much as you can. Going forward you’re going to annotate all the time, because you can because you’re there, but you can still go back in time and annotate. 

Remove old users

One thing that I didn’t really talk about today but you should also do, when it comes to the general health of your Analytics, is go in and check who has user permissions to all of your different Analytics accounts.

Remove old users. Take a look at that once a quarter. Just it’s good governance to do. 

Update sampling and timeouts

Then you’re going to update your sampling and your timeouts. If you can do all of these things and check back in on them regularly, you’re going to have a healthy, robust, and extremely usable Analytics ecosystem. Let me know what your favorite things to do in Analytics are. Let me know how you’re tracking events in GTM.

I want to hear all about everything you all are doing in Analytics. So come holler at me in the comments. Thanks.

Video transcription by Speechpad.com



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3 local commerce trends to make a big impact in 2020



Bill Dinan

As the year winds down, it’s time to look at what’s in store for the local business landscape in the coming year. The good news is the benefits of enterprise-grade technology are becoming more accessible to this business segment. We see this shift taking hold in 2020, along with a stronger confluence of complementary solutions coming together to meet comprehensive SMB needs. The following are three top local commerce trends that our Local Search Association analysts predict will take center stage in 2020.

  1. Shifting into BIY technology: The concept of buy-it-yourself (BIY) SaaS technology is empowering small and local businesses to purchase technologies that are designed to meet their holistic needs in a self-service delivery model. Whether delivering martech, adtech, fintech or other key operational services, in 2020 we expect to see more SaaS solutions offering a BIY approach for small businesses for improved customer retention and satisfaction as well as higher average order values.
  2. Amazon blitzes Retail-as-a-Service (RaaS): Amazon will soon roll out a “retail-as-a-service” offering for local retailers as one of the secret endgames of Amazon Go stores. It will utilize the technology for cashier-less stores and reflect Amazon’s signature logistical streamlining capabilities to help local retailers improve margins and yield through modernized operations.
  3. Uber makes a Local Ads play: Uber will continue to gain economies of scale through services that are adjacent to rides (Eats, etc.). It will also build on its existing rides architecture with a local ad engine. This will utilize captive audiences during the app’s in-ride mode, as well as robust data on riders’ spatial patterns. This will start with ads for local restaurants (a component of Eats) but could move into other local categories. It will be a self-serve programmatic ad engine and potentially bid-based for locally relevant placement. 

Opinions expressed in this article are those of the guest author and not necessarily Marketing Land. Staff authors are listed here.


About The Author

Bill Dinan is president of the Local Search Association, a not-for-profit association of 300+ media companies, agencies and technology companies that enable enterprises and small businesses to achieve more within local markets. Bringing deep expertise on how local commerce industries are evolving with new technology and business approaches, Dinan has successfully led and grown companies over the last few decades, including WEB.com, Acquisio, Telmetrics and others. He can be reached at bill@thelsa.org.





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The Economics of Link Building



Alex-T

Life has taught me that good things should be expensive — especially when it comes to any type of digital marketing services. If you’re not an expert, you can end up getting something far from what you’ve been expecting.

Here’s an example of “the best mascot image you can get for your event” that I paid for when organizing one of our first Digital Olympus events:

Just for reference, this is how our mascot looked originally:

My point is, just like working with freelance designers, hiring SEO consultants is only safe when you know exactly what you need and can control every step of the contract. This both relates to the scope or work and the price of contract.

I get really confused when I hear that the price of an average SEO agency contract starts at $1k USD. This number was first shared by Rand Fishkin in 2012 when he asked 600 agencies about their typical rates. Later, in 2018, that same number was published by Ahrefs when they did a similar survey.

As an SEO practitioner, I’m a bit disappointed with the stability of rates, but what bothers me the most is that this rate doesn’t really include link building. I can hardly imagine a successful SEO campaign for an SMB site without acquiring links. To back up my statement with some numbers, I’d like to mention Ross Hudgens’ claim that acquiring a good link on a top-notch site should cost $1k USD. Ironically, that’s the whole budget of an average SEO contract.

But to be honest, I don’t quite agree with those rates even though I truly respect the opinion. It doesn’t seem that realistic at scale: if you want to build 10 links, it would cost you $10k, a hundred links, $100k etc. That’s just plain impossible for the majority of companies. Don’t get me wrong, I would LOVE to work with those rates, but I can hardly imagine a business willing to pay one hundred thousand dollars for one hundred links. And to be completely fair, in some niches even a hundred links won’t move the needle.

See for yourself. Here’s one of our clients who thought that 100 links would help them:

And here’s what’s been going on with their organic traffic coming back to their blog from the links that we built:

To give you some context for their SEO situation, this client also wanted to rank for keywords related to link building. Below you can see one of my favorite examples of how fierce the competition is in the niche where people want to rank for such a generic term as “link building”:

This screenshot is screaming a simple fact out loud: you need to have at least 2,000 referring domains to outrank the pages that are currently in the top. Remember the link building rates that I’ve just named? How much would such work be worth? Looks like you might need a new round of investments if a rate per link remains at $1k USD.

Now, look, I feel for you. Link building should be affordable for SMB sites because what’s the point in getting into it if the game’s been fixed to begin with? In this post, I’ll show you that link building shouldn’t cost an arm and a leg, and even a small site can do it with enough dedication put into solving the issue. I’ll walk you through some of the most popular link building strategies and explain why some of them aren’t economically attractive. And I’ll explain the costs of certain options (or in other words, why the hell does your link builder charge you so much?) and show you what benefits they can offer your business.

Link building landscape: Email outreach strategy to rule them all

Some time ago, I had quite a long flight to Bali where I was speaking at the DMMS conference. I had a chance to watch a few movies including Tolkien, who was among my favorite authors growing up. Sadly, the movie had a weak plot that doesn’t really begin to explain how Tolkien came to invent his own language. However, it did bring up something to do with link building, believe it or not. Connections that you build throughout your life impact you a great deal. Put “your site” in place of “you” in the last sentence and voilá — here’s my point. If you follow the wrong path, you’ll surround yourself with bad connections (and, using my link building metaphor, bad links).

I’m always keen to discuss things from a philosophical point of view, but let’s get practical for a moment. How can you build high-quality links that will bring the best SEO results and will still be affordable?

Even though there are tons of link building strategies, on a general note, you can narrow them down to a few:

Links that are acquired through email outreach 

First of all, let’s clear up on the terminology. I see any strategy that includes sending emails to other websites to negotiate the possibility of getting a link as email outreach. For instance, such well-known strategies as broken link building, building links through guest posting, scraping SERPs and then pitching your content to those sites, and many others. That’s all email outreach because they all involve pitching something to someone through emails. The only way in which some of those strategies are different from the others is that they require some sort of written content. For example, guest posting requires you to write a post — that’s obvious. This significantly increases the costs of work, and here we are, approaching the above-mentioned number of 1k USD. To be honest, guest posting is not my favorite strategy due to many limitations that it has (I’ll share them with you later in this post, so keep reading!)

Links from digital PR campaigns 

Even though this strategy also relies on sending emails, your recipients aren’t website owners but journalists. So, this strategy is quite harder to execute. They require newsworthy content, you should have the necessary connections, be able to pitch it to the journos etc. etc. Also, digital PR campaigns always cost 10X more than any traditional email outreach campaign. That’s just because they bring links from media outlets that have not only great SEO value, but also let your brand connect with a broader audience.

Paid links

I don’t like these types of links and I don’t recommend anyone to try to acquire them. But I feel that I can’t skip this point as, in reality, paid links are in high demand. Some marketers are always trying to find the shortcut and look for sites that sell links.

There aren’t too many options out there when it comes to link building. Let me show you how some of the listed options aren’t economically right or simply won’t bring any solid SEO boost.

What are the pros and cons of each strategy?

Below you’ll find a quick sum-up of the most significant pros and cons of each strategy. It’s important to mention that here, at my agency, we only build links through email outreach as I believe it is by far the most cost-effective strategy. As of links built through digital PR, I used to do that, but in my experience, the results were not quite worth their significant costs.

Paid links

Let’s start with the tricky option — paid links. Here I’m talking about the links that you can purchase through sponsored content and that won’t be labeled with a special tag. I’m not going to talk about the ethical side of this strategy, as that would require a separate post. I just want to state that I know tons of sites that do it.

Pros:

  • It’s very fast. You can build as many links as you’d like. The only limitation is your budget.

Cons:

  • Sites that sell links do it at scale. At some point, they will be penalized by Google.
  • Consequently, if those links are risky, you’ll have to disavow them some time later.
  • Most likely there will be a tiny number of sites with exceptionally high domain ratings.

Digital PR link building

A few years ago, I was one of the biggest digital PR fans around, but time passed, and now I clearly see what kind of limitations this approach bears. Digital PR is an essential part of the promotion strategy for businesses that have recently established their brand and want to build trust with their audience. Plus, links from media outlets will automatically give Google’s a signal that your site is a trustworthy business. The only downside is that the majority of businesses don’t have a big fat budget for a proper digital PR campaign. Here’s a good post from Gisele Navarro that shares some extra angles on why brands do and don’t need digital PR.

Pros:

  • Getting links from media outlets will eventually grow your domain authority and give Google enough reasons to believe that your brand is trustworthy.
  • They make your brand more visible to a broader audience.
  • Showing to your potential clients that your brand was featured in The New York Times or on BBC is cool. Like, really cool.

Cons:

  • It’s very, very expensive. The costs for an average digital PR campaign start from $30k–$40k USD.
  • This strategy requires specific content which is why it gets so pricey.
  • It takes a few months to build such links — to ideate and execute the campaign, gather attention, get coverage, etc.
  • The price per link is very high. Normally it revolves around $1k USD.

Email outreach link building

I believe this to be the best link building strategy that fits nearly every business’ needs, especially if your goal is to start getting traffic to already existing pages. And to top it off, its cost per link is affordable even for small and medium-sized businesses.

Pros:

  • You can build links to nearly any page (including your commercial pages).
  • The price per link doesn’t go through the roof (it varies from $100 to $500 USD depending on the referring site’s domain quality)
  • A lot of link building agencies even allow you to buy one link (however, we aren’t within that tier as we prefer quality over quantity).
  • It allows you to build relationships with your industry peers.
  • It makes your brand more visible to your target audience.
  • It helps you get links from top-notch industry sites.

Cons:

  • Requires some special skills and knowledge (an average email has only an 8.5% open rate which makes it quite a hard practice).
  • Such links can’t be built overnight. However, the time they take is less than the PR-based links.
  • Such links have some hidden reputational risks (if you do it the wrong way, sending tons of outreach emails = being potentially seen as a spammer).

To sum it up, there are many reasons to believe that link building through email outreach is your to-go strategy if your main goal is to get more organic traffic from Google. The next big question is how many links you need and what it’s going to cost you.

How to estimate the number of links you need

A few weeks ago, I was lucky to listen to Robbie Richards’ speech at the DMSS conference where he confirmed my link building formula. If you’re competing with a site with similar on-site characteristics (both sites are https, mobile-friendly, fast, Google considers them both a brand plus a few other factors) then, in order to outrank it in search, you need to keep in mind only two factors*:

  • Your domain’s authority should be circa the same number as of the pages that you want to outrank;
  • You should have the same or a bit more referring domains compared to the pages that currently outrank you.

*In particular cases, internal linking plays a huge role. Not that long ago, my good friend Joe Williams published a great post where he goes into more detail on the topic.

This formula might vary based on your estimated domain authority (DA) or on your domain rating (DR). If you have a higher domain score than the pages that you want to outrank, then you’ll just need fewer links. But if your DR is lower, you’ll need significantly more links, and that’s something you need to account for.

Here’s some context: let’s take a look at my own site. Digital Olympus is not doing very well in the SERPs because of its DR. On average, all sites that are ranking for search queries related to email outreach have a domain rating of 70–80, while our own site is only 56. So, this means that we need at least two times more links referring to our pages in comparison to the sites that are above us in search. For instance, to get this page to the top of search results for “email outreach,” we need to build around 200 links. As you can see from a screenshot below, the rest of the URLs have 100+ links, so we need to double that number to stand a chance:

Another approach to this situation would require us to calculate how many links we need to get the overall domain rating of 70. That’s around 250 links from sites with DR higher than 30 (I don’t consider sites that have smaller DR of good quality).

Once you know the necessary number of links to build, you should decide whether you’re capable of doing it on your own. I’m not trying to convince you to hire an agency, but if you’ve never done link building, it’s going to take around a year to set up the process and start building from 10–20 links a month, realistically speaking.

I don’t want to demotivate you, but such tasks are truly skill-demanding. A few years ago, I could barely build several links per month. So, if you have a budget and need links right away, it makes sense to hire someone to help you. The main reason why our clients hire us is that we’ve built relationships in the industry. We’re known, which allows us to build links fast.

What’s the right price for an email outreach link building campaign?

Different agencies have different rates when it comes to link building through email outreach. As a time-consuming strategy, it very much relies on the agency’s approach which is always unique even if it relies on the common practices. Some charge per campaign, some per link, and some would prefer to ask you to pay not less than a certain amount on a monthly basis.

For example, the people at LinksHero charge from $3k USD and promise to build around 5–15 links per month:

In case you want to pay as you go and don’t want to be bound by any monthly commitments, then DFYlinks.com is your best choice. Their link building services are highly recommended by such well-known experts as Cyrus Shepard, Ryan Stewart, and many others. DFYlinks sell guest post links and their cheapest option will cost you only $160 USD:

Another link building agency trusted by such industry experts as Ryan Stewart and Steven Kang is Authority Builders. Even though they don’t have a pricing page, I had a chat with their founder, Matt Diggity, and he said that their basic rate is $170–$180 USD.

If you’re wondering where my agency stands, we’re from a bunch that charge per number of acquired links, post-factum. I think it’s the best option for small and mid-size businesses, as it gives you more freedom and allows you to build links at your own pace.

Our rate is somewhere in the middle, even though the quality of our links is above average, as we’re getting our links from corporate and top-notch blogs. Plus, we don’t send mass emails so you won’t face any associated reputation risks. We’ve spent the last couple of years building relationships with people, so right now we’re simply reaching out to them instead of doing mass email blasts. For our services, we charge from $300 USD per link, so you can easily calculate your overall budget to build, say, a hundred links. However, we work only in the B2B niche — specializations are important to consider before you choose an agency.

So that’s the rundown on how much it costs to build links. Hopefully you should now be able to estimate your budget in order to build the desired number of links to your site. And let me just say this: for businesses that have already built some trust and visibility, getting even sixty new, quality referring domains can make all the difference and help them achieve sustainable organic traffic growth:

That’s a lot to take in, I know. But there’s more to talk about. For example, there are tons of hidden benefits to email outreach delivered the right way. Just stay with me, we’re getting there.

How to get more from every link that you earn

I love handmade email outreach link building as it allows you to do more than build links. You’re also building relationships that can help you move the needle far beyond link building alone.

People who are your link building partners today can organize a conference tomorrow and invite you to speak, which can allow you to become more visible within your niche. That’s not as rare as it may seem! And if you’re curious, yes, I’m referring to our own experience: besides doing link building, we also run our own digital marketing conference Digital Olympus (which, by the way, will be next held in Krakow on April 5th 2020).

Another benefit worth mentioning is that the companies that you connect with during your email outreach link building campaign also invest in growing their businesses. As a result, the site that has a domain score of 50 might get it up to 70 in a few months. In other words, today you’re paying for something that might get much more valuable in the future, and that’s what makes email outreach link building epic!

Here’s a list of sites from which we built links for one of our clients. You can see how their domain scores have grown since May 2019:

Start working on a link building profile that will rule them all!

Your next step is up to you, but in my experience, it’s important to start working on links as early as possible. Otherwise, there’ll be a huge gap between your site and your competitors who have been working on link building for a while.

Also, I know that the majority of businesses would like to run their link building campaigns in-house. Starting early gives you a leg-up to build your processes and test things. If you decide that it’s your way, please don’t follow the “best practices,” as 99% of them are infinitely outdated. Most of those strategies have been discontinued years ago in the link building community, and only rookies still fall for them.

The list of no-BS resources

If you’re looking for more information about doing DIY link building, here are a few useful posts that won’t turn you into a spammer who’s asking for a link because “they’ve been following another person’s blog for ages” (that’s a link builders private joke):

Conclusion

I’m not sure what else is there for me to say to convince you that email outreach is the way to do link building. And so I won’t try to convince you anymore — I’ll just sum up what I’ve told you already.

First of all, assess your situation and decide what’s more important for you at the moment: building links fast or building your own process of acquiring links in-house. If you decide in favor of the first option, calculate the number of links you need to build, estimate your budget, and find a reputable agency to help you out. And if you settle for the latter, get ready to spend some time on building relationships, mastering your outreach email copy, and streamlining creating valuable content.

But don’t worry — in the end, it’s all going to be worth it.



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6 Local Search Marketing DIY Tips for the Crafting Industry



MiriamEllis

Think crafting is kids’ stuff? Think again. The owners of quilting, yarn, bead, fabric, woodworking, art supply, stationers, edible arts, and related shops know that:

  • The crafting industry generated $44 billion in 2016 in the US alone.
  • 63% of American households engage in at least one crafting project annually, while more than one in four participate in 5+ per year.
  • The top three craft store chains in the country (Michaels, JOANN, Hobby Lobby) operate nearly 3,000 locations, just among themselves.
  • There are an estimated 3,200 US storefronts devoted to quilting alone. Thousands more vend everything from the stuff of ancient arts (knitting, with a 1,000-year history) to the trendy and new (unicorn slime, which, yes, is really a thing).

Our local search marketing industry has devoted abundant time to advising major local business categories over the past couple of decades, but crafting is one substantial retail niche we may have overlooked. I’d like to rectify this today.

I feel personally inspired by craft store owners. Over the years, I’ve learned to sew, quilt, embroider, crochet, knit, and bead, and before I became a local search marketer, I was a working fine artist. I even drafted a sewing pattern once that was featured in a crafting magazine. Through my own exploration of arts and crafts, I’ve come to know so many independent business owners in this industry, and have marketed several of them. These are gutsy people who take risks, work extremely hard for their living, and often zestfully embrace any education they can access about marketing.

Today, I’m offering my six best marketing tips for craft retailers for a more successful and profitable 2020.

First, a quick definition of local search marketing

Your store is your location. Your market is made up of all of your customers’ locations. Anything you do to promote your location to the market you serve is considered local search marketing. Your market could be your neighborhood, your city, or a larger local region. Local search marketing can include both offline efforts, like hanging eye-catching signage or getting mentioned in local print news, and online efforts, like having a website, building listings on local business listing platforms, and managing customer reviews.

Whatever you do to increase local awareness about your location, interact online with customers, bring them through your front door, serve them in-store, and follow up with them afterwards in an ongoing relationship counts. You’re already doing some of this, and in the words of Martha Stewart, “It’s a good thing.” But with a little more attention and intention, these six tips can craft even greater success for your business:

1. Take a page from my Google scrapbook

To engage in local search marketing is to engage with Google. Since they first started mapping out communities and businesses in 2004, the search engine giant has come to dominate the online local scene. There are other important online platforms, but to be in front of the maximum number of potential customers and to compete for rankings in Google’s local search results, your crafting business needs to:

  1. Read the Guidelines for representing your business on Google and follow them to the letter. This set of rules tells you what you can and can’t do in the Google My Business product. Listing your business incorrectly or violating the guidelines in any way can result in listing suspension and other negative outcomes.
  2. Create your free Google My Business listing once you’ve read the guidelines. Here’s Moz’s cheat sheet to all of the different fields and features you can fill out in your listing. Fill out as many fields as you possibly can and then Google will take you through the steps of verifying your listing.
  3. Reckon with Google’s power. As our scrapbook says, Google owns your Google My Business listing, but you can take a lot of control over some of its contents. Even once you’ve verified your listing, it’s still open to suggested edits from the public, questions, reviews, user-uploaded photos and other activities. Main takeaway: your GMB listing is not a one-and-done project. It’s an interactive platform that you will be monitoring and managing from here on out.

2. Weave a strong web presence

Your Google My Business listing will likely be the biggest driver of traffic to your craft store, but you’ll want to cast your online net beyond this. Once you feel confident about the completeness and ongoing management of your GMB listing, there are 4 other strands of Internet activity for you to take firm hold of:

Your website

At bare minimum, your website should feature:

  • Your complete and accurate name, address, phone number, email, and fax number
  • Clear written driving directions to your place of business from all points of entry
  • A good text description of everything you sell and offer
  • An up-to-date list of all upcoming classes and events
  • Some high-quality photos of your storefront and merchandise

A more sophisticated website can also feature:

  • Articles and blog posts
  • Full inventory, including e-commerce shopping
  • Customer reviews and testimonials
  • Online classes, webinars and video tutorials
  • Customer-generated content, including photos, forums, etc.

The investment you make in your website should be based on how much you need to do to create a web presence that surpasses your local competitors. Depending on where your store is located, you may need only a modest site, or may need to go further to rank highly in Google’s search engine results and win the maximum number of customers.

Your other local listings

Beyond Google, your business listings on other online platforms like Yelp, Facebook, Bing, Apple Maps, Factual, Foursquare, and Infogroup can ensure that customers are encountering your business across a wide variety of sites and apps. Listings in these local business information indexes are sometimes referred to as “structured citations” and you have two main choices for building and maintaining them:

  • You can manually build a listing on each important platform and check back on it regularly to manage your reviews and other content on it, as well as to ensure that the basic contact info hasn’t been changed by the platform or the public in any way.
  • You can invest in local listings management software like Moz Local, which automates creation of these listings and gives you a simple dashboard that helps you respond to reviews, post new content, and be alerted to any emerging inaccuracies across key listing platforms, all in one place. This option can be a major time saver and deliver welcome peace of mind.

Structured citation management is critical to any local business for two key reasons. Firstly, it can be a source of valuable consumer discovery and new customers for your shop. Secondly, it ensures you aren’t losing customers to frustrating misinformation. One recent survey found that 22% of customers ended up at the wrong location of a business because online information about it was incorrect, and that 80% of them lost trust in the company when encountering such misinformation. Brick-and-mortar stores can’t afford to inconvenience or lose a single customer, and that’s why managing all your listings for accuracy is worth the investment of time/money.

Your unstructured citations

As we’ve just covered, a formal listing on a local business platform is called a “structured citation.” Unstructured citations, by contrast, are mentions of your business on any type of website: local online news, industry publications, a crafter’s blog, and lists of local attractions all count.

Anywhere your business can get mentioned on a relevant online publication can help customers discover you. And if trusted, authoritative websites link to yours when they mention your business, those links can directly improve your search engine rankings.

If you’re serving a market with little local competition, you may not need to invest a ton of time in seeking out unstructured citation opportunities. But if a nearby competitor is outranking you and you need to get ahead, earning high-quality mentions and links can be the best recipe for surpassing them. All of the following can be excellent sources of unstructured citations:

  • Sponsoring or participating in local events, organizations, teams, and causes
  • Hosting newsworthy happenings that get written up by local journalists
  • Holding contests and challenges that earn public mention
  • Joining local business organizations
  • Cross promoting with related local businesses
  • Getting featured/interviewed by online crafting magazines, fora, blogs, and videos

Read The Guide to Building Linked Unstructured Citations for Local SEO for more information.

Your social media presence

YouTube, Instagram, Pinterest, Facebook, Twitter, crafting forums…choices abound! How much time and where you invest in social media should be determined by two things:

  • What your local competition is doing
  • Where your potential customers spend social time

If your shop is literally the only game in town, you may not need to win at social to win business, but if you have multiple competitors, strategic social media investments can set you apart as the most helpful, most popular local option.

In your social efforts, emphasize sharing, showing and telling — not just selling. If you keep this basic principle in mind, the DIY revolution is at your fingertips, waiting to be engaged. One thing I’ve learned about crafters is that they will travel. Quilting retreats, knitting tours, and major craft expos prove this.

If you or a staff member happen to create one of the most-viewed videos on YouTube for the three-needle bind off or crafting felt succulents, it could inspire travelers to put your shop on their bucket list. One of my favorite knitters in the world films the English/Swedish language Kammebornia podcast which is so idyllic, it would certainly inspire me to visit the island of Gotland if I were ever anywhere nearby. Think what you can do via social media to make your shop an aspirational destination for even non-local customers.

3. Abandon fear of ripping out mistakes (and negative reviews)

As the old adage goes, “Good knitters are good rippers.” When you drop a stitch in an important project, you have to know how to see it, patiently rip out stitches back to it, and correct the mistake as skillfully as you can. This exact same technique applies to managing the reviews customers leave you online. When your business “drops the ball” for a customer and disappoints them, you can often go back and correct the error.

Reviews = your business’ reputation. It’s as simple (and maybe scary) as that. Consider these statistics about the power of local business reviews:

  • 87% of consumers read local business reviews (BrightLocal)
  • 27% of people who look for local information are actually seeking reviews about a particular store. (Streetfight Mag)
  • 30% of consumers say seeing business owners’ responses to reviews are key to them judging the company. (BrightLocal)
  • 73.8 percent of customers are either likely or extremely likely to continue doing business with a brand that resolves their complaints. (GatherUp)

To be competitive, your craft store must earn reviews. Many business owners feel apprehensive about negative reviews, but the good news is:

  • You can “rip out” some negative reviews simply by responding well to them. The owner response function actually makes reviews conversational, and a customer you’ve made things right with can edit their initial review to a more positive one.
  • Most consumers expect a business to receive some negative reviews. Multiple surveys find that a perfect 5 star rating can look suspicious to shoppers.
  • If you continuously monitor reviews, either manually or via convenient software like Moz Local that alerts you to incoming reviews, there is little to fear, because customers are more forgiving than you might have thought.

For a complete tutorial, read How to Get a Customer to Edit Their Negative Review. And be sure you are always doing what’s necessary to earn positive reviews by delivering excellent customer service, keeping your online listings accurate, and proactively asking customers to review you on Google and other eligible platforms.

4. Craft what online can’t — 5 senses engagement

Consider these three telling statistics:

  • Over half of consumers prefer to shop in-store to interact with products. (Local Search Association)
  • 80% of U.S. disposable income is spent within 20 miles of home (Access Development)
  • By 2021, mobile devices alone will influence $1.4 trillion in local sales. (Forrester)

There may be no retailer left in American who hasn’t felt the Amazon effect, but as a craft shop owner, you have an amazing advantage so many other industries lack. Crafters want to touch textiles and fibers before buying, to hold fabrics up to their faces, to see true colors, and handle highly tactile merchandise like beads and wood. When it comes to fulfilling the five senses, online shopping is miles behind what you can provide face-to-face.

And it’s not just customers’ desire to interact with products that sets you apart — it’s their desire to interact with experts. As pattern designer Amy Barickman of Indygo Junction perfectly sums it up:

“To survive and thrive, brick-and-mortar stores must now provide experiences that cannot be replicated online.”

The expertise of your staff, the classes you hold, and tie-in services you offer, the sensory appeal of your storefront, the time you take to build relationships with customers all contribute to creating valued interactions which the Internet just can’t replace.

This advantage ties in deeply with the quality of your staff hiring and training practices. One respected survey found that 57% of customer complaints stem from employee behavior and poor service. Specifically in the crafting industry, staff who are expert with the materials being sold are worth their weight in gold. Be prepared to assist both seasoned crafters and the new generations of customers who are just now embracing the creative industries.

Play to your strengths. In every way that you market your business, emphasize hands-on experiences to draw people off their computers and into your store. In every ad you run, blog post you write, phone call you answer, listing you build, invite people to come in to engage all five senses at your place of business. Soft lighting and music, a tea kiosk, fragrant fresh flowers, some comfy chairs, and plenty of tactile merchandise are all within your reach, making shopping a pleasure which customers will want to enjoy again and again.

5. Learn to read your competitors’ patterns

Need to know: there are no #1 rankings on Google. Google customizes the search engine results they show to each person, based on where that person is physically located at the time they look something up on their phone or computer. You can walk or drive around your city, performing the identical search, and watch the rankings change in the:

Local Packs

Maps

Organic results

If you’re doing business in an area with few competitors, you may only need to be aware of one or two other companies. But when competition is more dense and diverse, or you operate multiple locations, the need for competitive analysis can grow exponentially. And for each potential customer, the set of businesses you’re competing with changes, based on that customer’s location. 

How can you visualize and strategize for this? You have two options:

  1. If competition is quite low, you can manually find your true local competitors with this tutorial. It includes a free spreadsheet for helping you figure out which businesses are ranking for your most desired searches for the customers nearest you. This is a basic, doable approach for very small businesses.
  2. If your environment is competitive or you are marketing a large, enterprise craft store brand, you can automate analysis with software. Local Market Analytics from Moz, for example, is designed to do all the work of finding true competitors for you. This groundbreaking product multi-samples searchers’ locations and helps you analyze your strongest and weakest markets. Currently, Local Market Analytics focuses on organic results, and it will soon include data on local pack results, too.

Once you’ve completed this first task, you have one more step ahead if you find that some of your competitors are outranking you. You’ll want to stack up your metrics against theirs to analyze why they are surpassing you. Good news: we’ve got another tutorial and free spreadsheet for this project! What emerges from the work is a pattern of strengths and weaknesses that signal why Google is ranking some businesses ahead of others.

Knowing who your competitors are and gathering metrics about why they may be outranking you is what empowers you to create a winning local search marketing strategy. Whether you find you need more reviews, a stronger website, or some other improvement, you’ll be working from data instead of making random guesses about how to grow your business.

6. Open your grab bag

Every craft store and craft fair has its grab bags, and who can resist them? I’d like to close out this article by spilling a trove of marketing goodies into your hands. Sort through them and see if there’s a fresh idea in here that could really work for your business to take it to the next level.

  • Be more! This year, Michaels has partnered with UPS at 1,100 locations in a convenience experiment. You run a craft store, but could it be more? Is there something lacking in your local market that your shop could double as? A meeting house, a lending library, an adult classroom, a tea shop, a Wi-Fi spot, a holiday boutique, a place for live music?
  • Tie in! Your quilt shop can support apparel sewers with a few extra solids, textiles, and some fun patterns. Your yarn shop can find a nook for needle arts. Your woodshop could offer wooden needles for knitting and crochet, wooden hoops for embroidery, wood buttons, stamps, and a variety of wood boxes for crafters. You may sell everything needed for beading jewelry, but do you have the necessary supplies to bead clothing? Crafters are hungry for local resources for every kind of project, especially in rural areas, suburbs, and other communities where there are few businesses.
  • Teach! There are so many arts and crafts that are incredibly challenging to learn without being shown, face-to-face. Not everyone is lucky enough to have a grandparent or parent to demo exactly how you do a long tail cast on or master the dovetail joint. If you want to sell merchandise, show how to use it. Look at JOANN, which just unveiled its new concept store in Columbus, Ohio, centered on a “Creators Studio”. One independent fabric shop near me devotes half its floorspace to classes for children — the next generation of customers!
  • Email! Don’t make the mistake of thinking email is old school. Statistics say that 47% of marketers point to email marketing as delivering the highest ROI and 69% of consumers prefer to receive local business communications via email. If you’re one of the 50% of small business owners who hasn’t yet taken the leap of creating an email newsletter, do it!
  • Survey! Don’t guess what to stock or how to do business. Directly ask your customers via email, social media, and in-store surveys what they really want. I’ve seen businesses abandon scented products because they found they were deterring migraine-prone shoppers. I’ve seen others implement special ordering services to source hard-to-access items in-store instead of letting consumer drift away to the online world. Giving the customer what they want is the absolute key to your store’s success.
  • Go green! Whether it’s powering your shop with solar, supporting upcycling crafts, or stocking organic and sustainable inventory, embrace and promote every green practice you can engage in. Numerous studies cite the younger generations as being particularly defined by responsible consumption. Demonstrate solidarity with their aspirations in the way you operate and market.

Doers, makers, creators, crafters, artisans, artists… your business exists to support their drive to embellish personal and public life. When you need to grow your business, you’ll be drawing from the same source of inspiration that all creative people do: the ability to imagine, to envision a plan, to color outside the lines, to gather the materials you need to make something great.

Local search marketing is a template for ensuring that your business is ready to serve every crafter at every stage of their journey, from the first spark of an idea, to discovery of local resources, to transaction, and beyond. I hope you’ll take the template I’ve sketched out for you today and make it your own for a truly rewarding 2020.



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